Beach Boys Wrap 50 Years as Questions Arise About Their 51st

With the 50th reunion coming to an end, the future of the Beach Boys remains up in the air.

(from Billboard.com, September 19, 2012) The Beach Boys are no strangers to internal conflict. It seems flaring egos and sudden departures have been a trademark of the band ever since their entry into the rock and roll music scene in the 1960’s. In the midst of a celebratory 50th anniversary tour and months after the release of the brand new album, “That’s Why God Made the Radio,” front man Mike Love announced that he would be departing the band after wrapping up the reunion tour in London on September 28. Interestingly enough, Love plans to tour under the Beach Boys title without original members Brian Wilson, Al Jardine, and David Marks this winter.

Mike Love and Brian Wilson are, without a doubt, the most recognized masterminds and musical geniuses behind the Beach Boys legacy. The 2012 “That’s Why God Made the Radio” and the reunion tour marked the first time that Brian Wilson contributed to the band since the eighties.

Fans across the globe breathed a sigh of relief and nostalgia when Wilson took the stage with Love at the 2012 Grammy Awards, as if egotistical rock star drama was finally put behind American music’s pride of the sixties. It seemed as if the Beach Boys had finally reached the maturity level to realize they were not going to grow any younger, and they might as well get along and make some great rock and roll music before they all die off.

It is clear, though, with Mike Love’s announcement to part ways with Wilson and company, that the Beach Boys are as polarized as ever. Despite the obvious tension that a mere six months of touring has caused the band members, the platinum award presentation, meet-and-greet, and acoustic performance on September 18 was full of smiles from all members, indicating a peaceful break-up. On October 9, remastered studio albums will be released with both mono and stereo mixes, the band announced during the Q & A session.